Why Do ISPs In Hawaii Have Terrible Customer Service?

why ISPs internet service providers have terrible customer service bad cable companies

The state of Hawaii has 12 internet service providers available at its disposal and the 6th most connected state in the US, with 98% of the residents who have access to broadband internet i.e. speeds of 25 Mbps or more. Honolulu being the biggest metropolitan, gets the average speeds of about 14 Mbps, next to Pearl City with speeds of 15 Mbps. These speeds of the internet are above the average speed of state which is 10 Mbps. 

However, when it comes to customer service, year after year, huge broadband and cable companies remain unsuccessful to provide. For instance, the recent American Consumer Satisfaction Index was released by the end of 2019, and cable providers and ISPs continue to witness the worst customer satisfaction scores in the US. Such companies are so ruthless at what they do, they're more often than not outdone by even everyone's favorite punching bag: the IRS (Internal Revenue Service). When it comes to broadband service on a scale of 100, some of the leading ISPs continue to deliver the worst scores in an already terrible scenario: 

"Internet Service Providers (ISPs) could not do any better when compared with the cable companies and the overall industry ratings which is at the same 62. The top three ISPs are Verizon FiOS (70), AT&T Internet (69), and Altice (63) that have rankings above the average. At the lowermost of the rankings are MediaCom (56), Frontier (55), and Windstream (57). 

After a few years or so, big broadband and cable companies would declare that they've finally witnessed the light and would be spending time to support their terrible customer service. As a couple of years ago, Comcast announced it had signed up a "Customer Experience VP" who will finally make the company's generally terrible customer service a topmost concern. Also, CEO Brian Roberts could be found no less than once a year stating that the company is heading for addressing the issue by hiring qualified people, refining support systems, and largely reconsidering the business's policies. You can also check for yourself Spectrum internet customer service that is constantly working on improving their customer's experience by automating and making the CS departments well equipped and trained to resolve the issues in no time. 

Things are in the same way bad when it comes to the cable TV front, despite the increase in competition from live streaming providers, compulsory cable operations still can't seem to realize this whole phenomenon of "treating their customers with respect" mechanism. Though most detested industries such as airlines ranked in the 70s and some more prominent brands like Amazon reached the 80s, and cable TV is still struggling somewhere in the 50s and 60s. 

When it comes to the cable TV sector, the development of live streaming video has provided its consumers with some relief. Streaming service providers which include Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon, consistently rate way much higher in customer satisfaction, for the reason that they give customers what they've been looking for ages: economical prices and flexible channel packages. In due course, cable operators would be required to play on price, nonetheless, they're seemingly waiting until immeasurable millions of their paying consumers have run away to greener grasses before really utterly revamping their business models. Though, the race in the TV space is intensifying either way. 

The broadband region is less favorable. With no significant regulatory error and slight competition, there's categorically no incentive to expand customer service or provide a better product in the majority of the markets. The emphasis remains on development for progress's sake (megamergers) and scale, minus the expansion of customer service in proportion. The final result should be impartially apparent, provided the broadband sector ranks inferior to a long list of extensively loathed sectors such as the banking, airline, and insurance businesses. That kind of achievement requires some thoughtful, continuous efforts that the kind of monopoly bias money just can't buy. 

Final Thoughts

AT&T tops the television category with a score of 70, next to Verizon with a score of 68. That's thought-provoking as while those two businesses have their own customer service concerns, they're essentially unknowns, in the cable range. 

The conventional cable companies Charter (NASDAQ: CHTR), Cox, and Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCS.A) all rank below the average for the business. Those big cable giants have promised to deliver better services, however, that visibly has not functioned.